Author Archives: Frederick Luis Aldama

Anatomy of a Panel: Alex Sanchez Brings YOU BROUGHT ME THE OCEAN

Anatomy of a Panel: Alex Sanchez Brings YOU BROUGHT ME THE OCEAN

Comics history is intermedial, seeing its evolution as a journey of creative cross-pollinations with stage, photographic, musical, film, animation, radio,  and long and short form prose narrative arts. Along with this history, there have been notable creator cross-overs and bi-directional cross-flows. From comics to long form narrative fiction we have notables like Stan Lee, Alan

Anatomy of a Panel: LA VOZ De M.A.Y.O. TATA RAMBO with Barajas and Gonzo

In case you hadn’t noticed, there’s an off-the-hook force of nature in the comics ecosphere: writer Henry Barajas and illustrator J. Gonzo. With Henry, think: razor-sharp instinct of a Joan Didion blended with the street-level acuity of a Carlos Monsiváis and the reportage panache of a Jorgé Ramos. With Gonzo, think: dynamism of Kirby, ligne

Anatomy of a Panel: David F. Walker and BITTER ROOT

To say that David Walker is a creative super-force of nature would be an understatement. Prodigious author of award-winning comics. Author of widely acclaimed YA and adult fiction. Writer of incisive pop cultural criticism and journalistic scholarship. Maker of documentary films. Passionate and dedicated professor across all the storytelling arts at Portland State University. It’s

Anatomy of a Panel: John Jennings, Damian Duffy, and PARABLE OF THE SOWER

Extraordinary comics creators in their own right, when joining forces the inestimable John Jennings (artist) and Damian Duffy (writer/letterer) pull off the superheroic. For over a decade, this virtuoso dynamic duo have channeled their co-creative talents into radical revolutionizing of the comics scene. Already in 2008, they pushed the art of comic book storytelling beyond

Anatomy of a Panel: Jaime Hernandez’s TONTA

In the comics world and beyond, Jaime Hernandez needs no introduction. However, his place in the radical revolution of comics — mainstream and Indy — does merit some review. In 1982, Fantagraphics published (64-pages in magazine size) Jaime and his bro Beto’s Love and Rockets. Together they showed the comics world a radically new aesthetic,

Comíx Latinx: The Pulse of Comics of Color in 2019

“Why Professor Latinx?”, a kid asked the other day. The moniker blazed across the front of my T-shirt. “You know how ProfessorX uses his high-tech Cerebro device to locate the planet’s supercool peeps — you know, us mutants — well, I keep my low-tech brain devices (eyes and ears) plugged into the pulse of what’s

Anatomy of a Panel: Ezra Claytan Daniels and UPGRADE SOUL

Ezra Claytan Daniels is comics creation in the 21st-century. From his self-published debut sci-fi comic The Changers and his mini comic Are You At Risk for Empathy Myopia? to his Upgrade Soul and his cocreations BTTM FDRS (with Ben Passmore) and the Afrofuturist animation The Golden Chain (with Adebukola Bodunrin), Ezra has been redefining the

Anatomy of a Panel: Ho Che Anderson and GODHEAD

From his erotic I Want to Be Your Dog (1990) as well as the masterfully braided narratives that make up Pop Life (1998) and Young Hoods in Love (1995) to his extraordinarily kinetic, hard-hitting three volume biography of King (1993-2002; 2010), genre bending Scream Queen (2005), and sci-fi existentialist extravaganza, Godhead (2018), since the early 1990s, Toronto based comics

Comíx Latinx: JALISCO, More than a Superhero Comic

Nearly three decades have passed since our communities — and finally the world — began to see the horrors in the Mexico/US borderlands: the epidemic spread of rape, mutilation, and murder of women in Ciudad Juárez and other Mexican bordertowns. In a post-1993 NAFTA super-exploitive economy, women are forced to work extreme hours for a

MILES MORALES, the Bildungsroman, and the Ethnoracial Pause

After a screening of my doc. Latinx Superheroes in Mainstream Comics at the Durham County Library, a librarian asked: “What comics do a good job representing diversity, especially for young readers?” My reflex answer: “Go to the independents! Begin with those Latinx and African American creators featured in the documentary. Then follow the yellow-bricks to

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