The Comics Classroom articles

The Comics Classroom: Exploring 47 RONIN, Part 2

The Comics Classroom: Exploring 47 RONIN, Part 2

In the previous entry, Dark Horse’s 2014 adaption of the 47 Ronin story was submitted as a superb example of the famous Japanese story for modern audiences. Stan Sakai’s art was also favorably compared to the woodblock prints of Ogata Gekkō. So, how can Mike Richardson and Stan Sakai’s comic be useful in exploring the history

The Walden Connection in DOOMSDAY CLOCK, Part 3

Promising paradise or threatening hell-fire is, we assumed, generally admitted to be unproductive. It is based upon a fundamental fraud which, when discovered, turns the individual against society and nourishes the very thing it tries to stamp out. What Jesus offered in return of loving one’s enemies was heaven on earth, better known as peace

The Walden Connection in DOOMSDAY CLOCK, Part 2

All men want, not something to do with, but something to do, or rather something to be. – Henry David Thoreau, Walden It is a mistake to suppose that the whole issue is how to free man. The issue is to improve the way in which he is controlled. – B.F. Skinner, Walden Two  

The Walden Connection in DOOMSDAY CLOCK, Part 1

Quick! Think of one of the most important books in American literature. While there are many reasonable answers to this question, works such as Adventures of Huckleberry Finn or Gone With the Wind, it might seem reasonable that you’d be confused if you heard somebody answer “B. F. Skinner’s Walden Two!” I was confused when I

COMICS CLASSROOM: The Role of Comics in Politics and Art [Part 3]

In the second part of this series I took the commentary surrounding Action Comics #987 to task, and while most aspects of the criticism leveled against the issue don’t stand, they got me thinking. What came to my mind was this: how do we tend to see, visually, immigrants in comics put out by companies

COMICS CLASSROOM: The Role of Comics in Politics and Art [Part 2]

In the first part of this series, points were established about how politics and comics intersect. While it is understood that politics and social issues have been part of the Big Two since before some of their most iconic characters, i.e.: Superman and Captain America, were even part of these companies as we know them

COMICS CLASSROOM: The Role of Comics in Politics and Art [Part 1]

A question I come across rather frequently on the internet while reading reviews and commentaries of recent comics is the following. “What place is there for comics in political discussions?” I’ve always been more than a little baffled by this for a few reasons, chief among which are: the two iconic standard bearers of both

The Immigrant, Ambassadorial and First-Generation Heroes (Part 1)

While there is never a wrong time to talk about such luminary comic book creations such as Captain America, right now seems like a particularly vital time to talk about: Steve Rogers, and the fact that he is a first-generation US citizen whose father and mother were immigrants. Wolverine, one of the most popular US

MS. MARVEL: Reflecting on Kamala Khan, Part 2

This column is the second part in a two-part series. You can find part 1 here. So, Kamala Khan is a young character whose comic has been a big hit. So what? How has she changed anything at Marvel directly? I believe that Kamala’s sales, sales which were fueled by Kamala’s young character and youthful

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