The Comics Classroom articles

COMICS CLASSROOM: The Role of Comics in Politics and Art [Part 3]

COMICS CLASSROOM: The Role of Comics in Politics and Art [Part 3]

In the second part of this series I took the commentary surrounding Action Comics #987 to task, and while most aspects of the criticism leveled against the issue don’t stand, they got me thinking. What came to my mind was this: how do we tend to see, visually, immigrants in comics put out by companies

COMICS CLASSROOM: The Role of Comics in Politics and Art [Part 2]

In the first part of this series, points were established about how politics and comics intersect. While it is understood that politics and social issues have been part of the Big Two since before some of their most iconic characters, i.e.: Superman and Captain America, were even part of these companies as we know them

COMICS CLASSROOM: The Role of Comics in Politics and Art [Part 1]

A question I come across rather frequently on the internet while reading reviews and commentaries of recent comics is the following. “What place is there for comics in political discussions?” I’ve always been more than a little baffled by this for a few reasons, chief among which are: the two iconic standard bearers of both

The Immigrant, Ambassadorial and First-Generation Heroes (Part 1)

While there is never a wrong time to talk about such luminary comic book creations such as Captain America, right now seems like a particularly vital time to talk about: Steve Rogers, and the fact that he is a first-generation US citizen whose father and mother were immigrants. Wolverine, one of the most popular US

MS. MARVEL: Reflecting on Kamala Khan, Part 2

This column is the second part in a two-part series. You can find part 1 here. So, Kamala Khan is a young character whose comic has been a big hit. So what? How has she changed anything at Marvel directly? I believe that Kamala’s sales, sales which were fueled by Kamala’s young character and youthful

MS. MARVEL: Reflecting on Kamala Khan, Part 1

Marvel Comics has had a unique variety of female superheroes among its ranks, but the iconic persona of Ms. Marvel has been one with a unique history going back to the late 60s. Originally, Ms. Marvel was a persona that was adopted by Carol Danvers, a U.S. Air Force officer. While Danvers and her title

Buttkick’n Moms in Comics: Beowulf, Aliens, and Lois Lane

While Beowulf might not be one of the most beloved texts in the Western world (due largely to the fact that few are going to appreciate things forced on them in high school), there is one element that always struck me as being interesting about the story: man, Grendel’s mom sure loved her kid. For

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