Top Stories articles

Interview: Simone and Staggs Switch It Up with CROSSWIND

Interview: Simone and Staggs Switch It Up with CROSSWIND

Ever wanted to be someone else? What if it just happened — in an instant — and you landed in an unfamiliar body in an unfamiliar place in a world so unlike your own? That’s just the bit with Image Comics’ upcoming series CrossWind from master creators Gail Simone and Cat Staggs. Both Simone and

Queerer Than Ever: 30 MORE Indie Titles Doing Right by LGBTA Fans

There’s been a lot of talk about diversity lately in the comic book industry, and not all of it good. But while some publishers are still talking about substantial LGBTA inclusion, others are out there doing it. We’ve been here before, with 70 other books that are offering significant queer representation. It’s time to wrap

Send in the Hoods: DEATHSTROKE, NIGHTHAWK, and the State of Violence in Chicago

If you could choose, would you want to live in Metropolis or Gotham City? Here’s the thing. I live in both. Chicago is the template for both of those iconic cities in recent films (The Dark Knight and Man of Steel), but rarely seen just as itself in comic book form, and even less frequently when

HERoes: Nicole Perlman

 Very few columns make me smile like HERoes, Comicosity’s focus on the process and influences of women creators — from new-to-the-scene to senior in the industry. This week we talk to writer Nicole Perlman, who has just launched a Gamora ongoing with Marvel Comics. – Senior Editor Matt Santori Jessica Boyd: Is there any major

Interview: Amanda Conner and Jimmy Palmiotti’s Big Bad Week

There’s no one in comics like Jimmy and Amanda. With a single comics week featuring new beginnings, at least one ending, and one book that’s a little of both, Amanda Conner and Jimmy Palmiotti would dominate even if we didn’t love them so much already. Sitting down with Comicosity to discuss — in rapid fire

Representation and Health 101: SUPERBOY Jon Kent

It’s time for a SUPER new Representation and Health 101. Ever since his introduction, I’ve felt like this character represented something new and hopeful for comics. Jon Kent, son of Superman, exposes a raw emotionality that is important for kids, young boys especially, and a gaping hole in how we discuss emotions in comics. He’s

Top