Tag Archives: DC Comics

Learning to Love the Legion: FUTURE STATE: LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #2

Learning to Love the Legion: FUTURE STATE: LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #2

SPOILERS! SPOILERS! SPOILERS! Legion of Super-Heroes ends for the foreseeable future by wrapping up the story begun last month in Future State: Legion of Super-Heroes #1 in a way that, if it isn’t wholly satisfying, is at least definitive. So… This is it. The final issue, so far as we know, of this run of

History of Violence: WONDER WOMAN, The Blue Snowman, and “Gender Issues”

One aspect of Wonder Woman’s mythology that’s always drawn my attention was her plethora of bizarre, colorful villains during the Golden Age. While she fought against more commonly known enemies such as Giganta and the original Cheetah, Wonder Woman also tangled against the likes of Baroness Paula von Gunther, Doctor Psycho, the Duke of Deception,

Learning to Love the Legion: FUTURE STATE: LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #1

SPOILERS! SPOILERS! SPOILERS! At some point in the future of the future, a ragtag band of former Legionnaires criss-crosses the galaxy, trying to get the team back together to confront the one responsible for the galaxy’s destruction… a former teammate! Well! That wasn’t quite what I was expecting! There is, at least in this issue,

Learning to Love the Legion: LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #12

SPOILERS! SPOILERS! SPOILERS! Everything comes to a head in what really feels like a final issue, at least for this creative team of Bendis, Sook, Von Grawbadger, Bellaire, and Sharpe. Now, I know this isn’t the LAST last issue, there’s Future State: Legion of Super-Heroes coming out… Geez, next week. But this issue ties up

Health and Inclusivity: Breaking the Code in MY VIDEO GAMES ATE MY HOMEWORK

It’s one thing for video games to be a distraction, but I never imagined they could literally devour my schoolwork. Unfortunately for Dewey Jenkins, he is very much aware. Dustin Hansen and Corey Breen come together in My Video Game Ate My Homework, which details Dewey’s journey to recover a science project, leading him, his

Learning to Love the Legion: LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #11

SPOILERS! SPOILERS! SPOILERS! We’re back, with a Thanksgiving edition of Legion of Super-Heroes! Gobble, gobble! You know who’s not thankful? The assorted Legionnaires caught in four kinds of catastrophe, as Rogol Zaar attacks New Krypton, Doctor Fate explodes, Ultra Boy encounters resistance as he tries to introduce democracy to Rimbor, and Mordru kidnaps Cosmic Boy

Learning to Love the Legion: LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #10

SPOILERS! SPOILERS! SPOILERS! All across the Galactic, Legionnaires interact and plots advance in this tenth issue of Legion of Super-Heroes. We’re settling back in with regular artists Ryan Sook, Wade Von Grawbadger, Jordie Bellaire, and Dave Sharpe as we move out of what broadly seems to have been the first “phase” of this new Legion

Learning to Love the Legion: LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #9

SPOILERS! SPOILERS! SPOILERS! This issue features art by David Marquez, Ryan Sook, Wade Von Grawbadger, Joe Quinones, Mike Grell, Ivan Reis, Joe Prado, Nick Derington, James Harren, John Romita, Jr., Klaus Janson, Nicola Scott, Arthur Adams, Jim Cheung, Gary Frank, Tula Lotay, Riley Rossmo, Gene Luen Yang, Kevin Nowlan, Michel Fiffe, Jenny Frison, Emanuela Lupacchino,

Learning to Love the Legion: LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #8

SPOILERS! SPOILERS! SPOILERS! This issue features art by Evan “Doc” Shaner, Jeff Lemire, Dustin Nguyen, Joëlle Jones, Michael Avon Oeming, Liam Sharp, André Lima Araújo, Sanford Greene, Cully Hamner, Yanick Paquette, Dan Hipp, David Mack, Darick Robertson, Dan Jurgens, Norm Rapmund, Bilquis Evely, Fabio Moon, Michael Allred, Ryan Sook, Wade Von Grawbadger, Alex Maleev, John

Doom and Bloom: Rachel Pollack and the Evolution of the DOOM PATROL

If you’ve been paying attention to the Doom Patrol in the past two decades, you might notice a key oversight. That is, how transgender author Rachel Pollack’s time as their writer has been largely ignored by DC’s marketing and editorial teams. Even John Arcudi’s run and John Byrne’s critically lambasted run (which even received its

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