Tag Archives: March

15 for 13 Plus: Comic Books for Younger Teens

15 for 13 Plus: Comic Books for Younger Teens

Comics for kids under 10. Comics for preteens. Of course we’d look next at what the comic industry has for your newly christened teenager. Whether it’s a bar or bat mitzvah around the corner, or your favorite niece or nephew about to embark on high school, these are 15 comics that are meant to inspire,

Transmyscira: A Mandate for Change (or, I Won an Eisner Last Night)

I won an Eisner last night for a single page that I scripted and my best friend drew. An Eisner I share with not just her, but dozens of creators, including most of my heroes that either made me want to make comics professionally or inspired me to dig in and stay the course when

MARCH: BOOK THREE Wins National Book Award

NEW YORK (November 17, 2016) — Congressman John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell received an unprecedented honor last night, as their book March: Book Three became the first graphic novel to ever receive the National Book Award. The March trilogy, published by Top Shelf Productions / IDW Publishing, depicts Lewis’s firsthand account of the Civil

MARCH Collaborators Aydin & Powell to Attend SPX

Bethesda, Maryland; September 1, 2016 Media Release – Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell collaborated with Civil Rights legend Congressman John Lewis on one of the most powerful graphic novel series in the history of the medium. The award winning March series documents Congress Lewis’ experiences in the early Civil Rights movement, culminating with the March

Most Anticipated Series of 2015

The year is winding to a close, which got us to thinking…what are we looking forward to next year? The Comicosity staff has gathered and submitted their top picks, today being Most Anticipated Series of 2015: Roderick Ruth TOKYO GHOST Written by Rick Remender Art by Sean Murphy Published by Image Comics Two of the

The Comics Classroom: Comics as History

One of the goals when I set out to write for and design The Comics Classroom was to accomplish two things. First, I wanted to explore comics from a non-traditional viewpoint as an aspiring academic who has only started to investigate the medium. Second, I believe that comics as an artistic medium contain the power

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