Tag Archives: Marvel Comics

KIRBYOLOGY!: Warren Ellis’s KARNAK and a Reminder to Not be the Worst

KIRBYOLOGY!: Warren Ellis’s KARNAK and a Reminder to Not be the Worst

I have a superpower of sorts. I can look at anything — a crowded coffee shop, a walk in the park with my dog, a conversation with a neighbor, a ride down the elevator, or just the creaky process of getting up in the morning — and immediately predict, in great detail, how it’s going

Jonathan Hickman’s X-MEN, and the House that Metaphor Built

The X-Men’s new storyline House of X/Powers of X, which promised to introduce a new era of X-Men stories, has passed its midpoint. While reading this storyline, I’ve been thinking about what drew me to the X-Men years ago and what it means to be a fan of a meaningful story that’s been published by

Deadly Nightshade: Poison Ivy, SQUADRON SUPREME, and a History of Sexualized Violence

Does it count as consent if the person you’re with has been programmed to never go against your orders — to always give consent, no matter what? In the recent Heroes in Crisis series, we saw Harley Quinn framed for murder and Poison Ivy killed — and subsequently reborn as a shell of her former self.

Hated and Feared: HOUSE OF X and POWERS OF X Examined

Taking on the voluntary mission of being the latest — in a long line of authors — to reintroduce a famous superhero team like the X-Men, in my humble opinion, is akin to reinventing the wheel or building a better mousetrap. No matter how good your concept, and no matter how unique your perspective, there

MILES MORALES, the Bildungsroman, and the Ethnoracial Pause

After a screening of my doc. Latinx Superheroes in Mainstream Comics at the Durham County Library, a librarian asked: “What comics do a good job representing diversity, especially for young readers?” My reflex answer: “Go to the independents! Begin with those Latinx and African American creators featured in the documentary. Then follow the yellow-bricks to

Fire and Suicide: The Legacy of THE DARK PHOENIX SAGA

Eleven is going to kill herself at the end of Stranger Things. Bold claim, I know. Especially since I don’t know how many seasons are left, nor have I uncovered any insider information in the coffee shop I’m sitting in. But listen, Eleven, Mike, and the rest of the gang are going to come up

Transmyscira: The X-Ploitation of Trans Death in UNCANNY X-MEN

Here we are again. There’s been another violent trans panic sequence in a major comic. This time it ends in murder and comes gift wrapped in the mutant metaphor. In Uncanny X-Men #17, Rahne Sinclair’s death is portrayed at the hands of a bunch of bros who harass her while sitting alone on a park

Comic Love: Being a New Fan and Reading Kamala Khan

“Sana [Amanat] and I initially had very modest expectations for this book. Our goal was to get to ten issues. It was going to be a fun side project—a young adult Muslim super hero! At Marvel!—that would have the lifespan of fun side projects. I budgeted a year for it. But by the time the

Health and Inclusivity: Jeremy Whitley on Representing Mental Illness

Nadia van Dyne’s exploits as the latest Wasp have created an all-new, all-different legacy for the Marvel Universe. From adventures with the Avengers to scouring the world for new Agents of G.I.R.L., an organization designed to specifically find, support, and highlight the work of genius women all over, she has added a quirkiness befitting of

Health and Inclusivity: CAPTAIN MARVEL and a Marvelous Recovery

With Captain Marvel hitting the silver screen, I’m beside myself with happiness — though there’s something about her that’s been in the back of my mind for a while. Carol’s relationship with substance abuse and recovery has always been huge to me. She stands as an example of what it takes to challenge that kind

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